I think he is correct, thank God! I said this years ago:  “Kirschner believes there’s actually a case to be made against Trump for all the lies and misinformation he spread about the coronavirus and how to defeat it, from his intentional falsehoods about the nature of the threat to his disgraceful conduct designed to undermine safeguards, such as mask mandates, entirely because he believed it helped him politically. Kirschner, who formerly headed up the homicide unit of the U.S. attorney’s office in Washington, D.C., told me that Trump’s “grossly negligent conduct was reasonably likely to result in death or serious bodily injury to another.”

This former state prosecutor – Ken Abraham – agrees with everything he says!

Excerpts from the Article:

Former federal prosecutor Glenn Kirschner has been speaking the blunt truth about Donald Trump’s criminal conduct for years. He’s not stopping now just because most of the media, and most Democrats in Congress for that matter, have moved on. I spoke to Kirschner, who is now an NBC News legal analyst, in a recent “Salon Talks” episode about Steve Bannon’s indictment and more.

During our conversation, we kept coming back to is Kirschner’s conviction that the disgraced former president is still a very real threat to our nation. And Kirschner, who served for more than 30 years as a federal prosecutor, is adamant that the only way to neutralize that threat is by prosecuting Trump for his crimes, ranging from those he may have committed in his effort to overturn the 2020 election to possible crimes arising from his mishandling of the pandemic.

Kirschner believes there’s actually a case to be made against Trump for all the lies and misinformation he spread about the coronavirus and how to defeat it, from his intentional falsehoods about the nature of the threat to his disgraceful conduct designed to undermine safeguards, such as mask mandates, entirely because he believed it helped him politically. Kirschner, who formerly headed up the homicide unit of the U.S. attorney’s office in Washington, D.C., told me that Trump’s “grossly negligent conduct was reasonably likely to result in death or serious bodily injury to another.”

Regarding the possible crimes arising from the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, Kirschner said this about Trump’s apparent role: “If you don’t punish an attempted overthrow of the government, an insurrection, a rebellion, we’re going to get more rebellions. That’s just common sense.” Watch my Salon Talks interview with Kirschner here or read a transcript of our conversation below to hear him lay out the case for manslaughter charges against Trump himself, and discuss the likelihood that prominent Trump allies are on their way to prison.

This article has been lightly edited for clarity and length.

Let’s start with Steve Bannon. He’s been indicted. Can you explain why there was a delay in this indictment? What do you think actually prompted the Department of Justice and the U.S. attorney in D.C to finally indict him?

We were on Steve Bannon indictment watch for 22 days from the day he was voted in contempt and referred for prosecution to the D.C. U.S. attorney’s office until the U.S. attorney finally presented it to the grand jury and the grand jury indicted him for two counts of contempt of Congress. Twenty-two days. We know historically it’s been done in as few as nine days. It was done to a Reagan-era EPA official named Rita Lavelle. Twenty-two days may sound like a long time. First of all, it wasn’t that long. It takes some time to put a quick investigation together, present it to the grand jury and have them vote out an indictment. But I really think the holdup was because there was an acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia in place at the front end of that 22-day period.

I’ve worked for more than 10 U.S. attorneys in D.C. Some of them were acting, some of them were interim, some of them were presidentially appointed and Senate-confirmed. Ordinarily when you have an acting U.S. attorney, that person just tries to keep the trains running on time, not make a lot of waves, not take on a lot of high-profile decisions. The new permanent U.S. attorney was confirmed by the Senate and took over one week before Steve Bannon was indicted. His name is Matt Graves, a former colleague of mine. He’s a good man. He’s a thoughtful man. He was a public corruption prosecutor when he was in my office. One week after he arrived, bam, Steve Bannon indicted. I think that’s an important tell and some foreshadowing about how promptly the new D.C. U.S. attorney is going to go about his business.

 

It is excellent. Read the whole story here.