THE LETTER BELOW WAS PUBLISHED on p. A 4 of The Delaware State News of 10/10/20. 🙂

I must keep ever alert, keeping an eye out for significantly misleading statements like several in this article.

First, I know from the calls, letters and emails which I receive daily (and my calls to two guards, who refuse to speak publicly for fear of unlawful retaliation), and my frequent contact with other prison reform advocates, that health care in America’s prisons remains a disaster. Don’t be deceived by statements like: “We will continue to expand upon these innovative ideas to provide the highest quality and cost-effective care to offenders.” High quality health care never has existed in our prisons.

The head of D O C also says: “Every offender in DOC custody receives medical screenings that identify treatment needs. Inmates with chronic and recurring conditions receive ongoing-care planning and follow-up treatment, according to the news release.” The “screening” is grossly inadequate, with inmates still dying within a few days of arrival and their initial screening, from various health issues, including drug overdoses which either went undetected or blatantly ignored when the inmate told the medical screener and guards something like: “I am suffering from an overdose of … meth, coke, etc. … and I feel terrible and need a doctor”!  No shit, folks, it is that bad!

Instead of this statement by Dr. Johnny Wu, Centurion’s chief of clinical operations: “Centurion is committed to leveraging proven best practices from our national network of caregivers and health care partners to provide excellent care to our Delaware patients and support their well-being,”  this clown should have said: “Centurion is committed to leveraging its proven propensity for lying and covering up its abysmal failures to ensure as much profit as possible for the corporation and its officers, like me.”

 

Excerpts from the Article:

The Delaware Department of Correction said today that innovative wound care being provided by its correctional health care provider is showing promising results in improving treatment for inmates. Inmates have a wide variety of routine and recurring health care needs, and newly arriving inmates may have open and infected wounds from a variety of conditions, including injection drug use, uncontrolled diabetes, obesity and physical trauma, according to a DOC news release. Skin irritation from opiate withdrawal and other causes, such as parasitic infestations, can also prompt prolonged scratching that exacerbates open wounds, the DOC said.

Through an “innovative” wound care service brought to Delaware by Centurion Health, the state’s correctional health care provider, inmates are receiving enhanced treatment and are recovering faster from skin wounds compared to traditional courses of treatment, according to the DOC.

“DOC has made a concerted effort over the past year to improve the quality of medical care inmates in our custody receive, and Centurion’s specialized wound care treatment is just one more example of our renewed focus on strengthening prison-based health care services,” said DOC Commissioner Claire DeMatteis.

“With the national expertise Centurion brings to the Delaware DOC, inmates are recovering more quickly and need fewer visits to outside emergency rooms and hospitalizations, which reduces the strain on our health care system. We will continue to expand upon these innovative ideas to provide the highest quality and cost-effective care to offenders.”

Every offender in DOC custody receives medical screenings that identify treatment needs. Inmates with chronic and recurring conditions receive ongoing-care planning and follow-up treatment, according to the news release.

Previously, according to the DOC, inmates with open wounds and wound-related skin infections received standard wound care treatments. DOC’s medical provider Centurion Health, which was awarded the contract to provide health care to Delaware inmates this spring, focused early on improving inmate access to high-quality and specialized wound care services.

As the nation’s largest provider of correctional health care, Centurion had employed the national wound care service MyWoundDoctor in other states. It began leveraging MyWoundDoctor services in Delaware four months ago and has experienced noticeable results improving patient outcomes, the DOC said.

Through this treatment service, prison-based medical staff employed by Centurion provide patient information, case notes and photographs electronically to MyWoundDoctor, whose wound care specialists design an individualized treatment plan using a variety of evidence-based approaches, the DOC said.

Treatment materials and a wound care package that takes into account the patient’s underlying chronic health conditions, present condition of the wound and location of the wound are prepared individually for each patient and delivered by express mail. Prison medical staff administer the specially designed course of treatment and closely monitor the patient’s condition. Regular updates are transmitted electronically to MyWoundDoctor specialists, who adjust the treatment protocol as needed, the DOC said.

“Centurion is committed to leveraging proven best practices from our national network of caregivers and health care partners to provide excellent care to our Delaware patients and support their well-being,” said Dr. Johnny Wu, Centurion’s chief of clinical operations.

 

The Whole Story:

Wound care treatment improving for inmates

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Letter to the Editor or Op Ed Submission – Keep Alert! 10/1/20

I must keep ever alert, keeping an eye out for significantly misleading statements like several in a recent article about Delaware D O C “healthcare”.

First, I know from the calls, letters and emails which I receive daily from inmates and their loved ones  (and my calls to two guards, who refuse to speak publicly for fear of unlawful retaliation), and my frequent contact with other prison reform advocates, that health care in America’s prisons remains a disaster.

Don’t be deceived by statements like: “We will continue to expand upon these innovative ideas to provide the highest quality and cost-effective care to offenders.” High quality health care never has existed in our prisons.

The head of D O C also says: “Every offender in DOC custody receives medical screenings that identify treatment needs. Inmates with chronic and recurring conditions receive ongoing-care planning and follow-up treatment, according to the news release.”

The “screening” is grossly inadequate, with inmates still dying within a few days of arrival and their initial screening, from various health issues, including drug overdoses which either went undetected or blatantly ignored when the inmate told the medical screener and guards something like: “I am suffering from an overdose of … meth, coke, heroin, etc. … and I feel terrible and need a doctor”!  No fooling, folks, it is that bad!

Whether the much touted new wound treatment works, I do not yet know, but time will tell.

I am not “bitching in the newspaper”; I am simply telling the public the truth, for they deserve no less.

Ken Abraham, former Deputy Attorney General, founder of Citizens for Criminal JUSTICE, Dover, DE 302-423-4067

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