You tell me … how is our “war on drugs” going?  It is the most costly, clearly cataclysmically failed policy in American history! How much longer will it take to see that the answer is staring us in the face?

Any way you argue it, the harm done by our current drug policies far, far outweighs any benefits!  READ http://www.citizensforcriminaljustice.net/the-power-of-advertising-win-the-war-on-dr = The Answer to the Drug Problem … or do you want to continue to waste about a hundred billion dollars a year, and get nowhere? 

Excerpts from the Article:

Fentanyl is driving drug overdose deaths in the U.S. overall, but in nearly half of the country, it’s a different story. Meth is the bigger killer, a new government report shows. Nationwide, most deaths still involve opioid drugs like fentanyl and heroin. But in 2017, the stimulant meth was the drug most frequently involved in deaths in four regions that include 19 states west of the Mississippi.

The report released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the agency’s first geographic breakdown of deaths by drug. It’s based on 2017 figures when there were more than 70,000 overdose deaths in the U.S., two-thirds of them involving opioids.

Fentanyl was involved in 39% of the deaths that year, followed by heroin, 23%, and cocaine, 21%. Those drugs top the list in the eastern part of the country.

Methamphetamine was No. 4 nationwide, cited in 13% of overdose deaths. But in the four western regions, it was No. 1, at 21% to 38%.

Previous CDC reports have charted meth’s increasing toll, noting that it rose from eighth to fourth in just four years. The new report found dramatic differences in the 10 regions. For example, In New England, fentanyl had the highest adjusted overdose death rate and meth was a distant 10th on the list. In the region that includes the mountain states and the Dakotas, meth was No. 1 and fentanyl was sixth.

Most of the meth in the U.S. is made in Mexico and smuggled across the border — U.S. production has actually been declining in recent years, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Its availability has held at high levels in recent years in areas of the Southwest, and has increased in some areas of the Midwest, the agency’s field offices report.

Final 2018 data has not yet been released, but preliminary figures suggest that overdose deaths involving meth increased. The CDC report is based on a search of overdose death certificates for the name of drugs. In many cases, a person was taking multiple drugs.

New Mexico has seen a shift. For years, black tar heroin was the biggest problem, then prescription painkillers, said Dr. Michael Landen of the state’s health department. State meth deaths went from 150 in 2017 to 194 last year, vaulting meth to the top.

He attributed the surge in meth to its wide availability and low cost, and said he worried it could get worse. While there are programs to deal with fentanyl and heroin overdoses, there’s not much in place to prevent meth deaths, he said.

“I think we’re potentially going to be caught off guard with methamphetamine deaths, and we have to get our act together,” he said.

The Whole Story

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Letter to the Editor – Another Reminder! – 10/28/19

You tell me … how is our “war on drugs” going?  It is the most costly, clearly cataclysmically failed policy in American history! How much longer will it take to see that the answer is staring us in the face?  How many more mothers’ sons and daughters must die before we change course, and take the effective, proven course to save lives?

Fentanyl is driving drug overdose deaths in the U.S. overall, but in nearly half of the country Meth is the bigger killer, a new government report shows. Nationwide, most deaths still involve opioid drugs like fentanyl and heroin. There were more than 70,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. in one year, two-thirds of them involving opioids.

Fentanyl was involved in 39% of the deaths a year, followed by heroin, 23%, and cocaine, 21%. Those drugs top the list in the eastern part of the country. Methamphetamine was No. 4 nationwide, cited in 13% of overdose deaths. But in the four western regions, it was No. 1, at 21% to 38%.

These are some irrefutable facts, but the harm runs deeper than even the deaths: Lives of families and children ruined, phenomenal wasted costs enforcing useless policies of prohibition, and the endless violence in the streets seeking to control the market!

Any way you argue it, the harm done by our current drug policies far, far outweighs any benefits!  READ http://www.citizensforcriminaljustice.net/the-power-of-advertising-win-the-war-on-dr  = The Answer to the Drug Problem … or do you want to continue to waste about a hundred billion dollars a year, and get nowhere? 

Urge politicians to actually help keep us safe, by ending the “war on drugs”!

Ken Abraham, founder of Citizens for Criminal JUSTICE, former Deputy Attorney General, Dover, DE 302-423-4067

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I get lots of letters published, and ghost write for others. THIS IS THE BEST WAY TO REACH THOUSANDS OF READERS! The keys to getting your Letter published are:
1. Keep it to 250 words or fewer.
2. Do not make it about “poor little old me”. Describe the problem as one which not only affects the individual, but is a senseless or ineffective measure, policy, or law which also harms communities and society. For example, with reentry, the obstacles make it unnecessarily difficult for the individual, but also harm society by making it hard to become productive, spending money and paying taxes in the community, and they cause increased recidivism = increased crime.
3. Speak from your heart.
4. Google any facts you are not sure about.
5. Do not name-call.
Do what works: Write that Letter!
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Letter to Editor – sign name, town, state, and your phone number (they often call to verify that you sent it), and “Member of Citizens for Criminal JUSTICE” if you like – shows you are part of a large group.
Send the email to yourself, and put on the “bcc” bar the email addresses for Letters to the Editor for the top ten newspapers in your state and several national ones – The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, U S A Today (google the Letter to Editor email addresses). Any questions, CALL me at 302-423-4067!
GOOGLE THE EMAIL ADDRESSES FOR “LETTERS TO THE EDITOR” FOR THE TOP TEN NEWSPAPERS IN YOUR STATE AND SAVE THAT INFORMATION FOR REPEATED USE – Some papers will print a letter from you every 2 ekke, some every 30 days, some every 90 days. They have varying policies. But if you really want to make a difference shoot them a new letter once a month! I send one out every 2 weeks.
Need a Letter on some criminal justice issue and not a great letter writer? NO EXCUSE! Email me a rough draft and call me and I’ll polish it up! kenabraham3138@gmail.com .
ANY QUESTIONS, CALL ME AT 302-423-4067.